Archive for the ‘ Education ’ Category

Parent participation in school improvement.

We often get enthusiastic parent or community groups that want to participate in school improvement, but many districts do not have a process that accommodates that effort. Why not let design thinking drive the solutions? The parents and teachers at Riverdale Country School in New York City and the folks at IDEO have produced a manual that may help. You will also need an integrative thinker or two (see Roger Martin, The Opposable Mind) to facilitate the process. Here is the URL for the manual…it’s free. http://www.designthinkingforeducators.com/

Competitive?

http://www.thegatesnotes.com/Topics/Education/World-Class-Education-Photo-Gallery

Even if you are suspicious of using high-stakes tests as a benchmark of national progress, this dataset showing high school and college graduation rates, college readiness and investment per student should be a wake-up call for us.

The six ways teachers want to change schools

The six ways teachers want to change schools

Here is an interesting idea…if you want to improve outcomes in our schools, why not listen to the professionals? Not the administrators, but the teachers. Many businesses have made dramatic gains by listening to their staff. How about our schools?

The Eleven Traits of a Good Teacher.

The Eleven Traits of a Good Teacher.

What would you include in your list?

Missing

Why can’t K – 12 organizations be as good as post-secondary institutions at connections with student and staff alumni? While not equal in terms of a source of revenue with post-secondary alumni, they nonetheless provide a strong base of experience and support. As charter schools increase their footprint, I expect they will no doubt use their connections to student alumni to their advantage, similar to what the private schools do already. But even the private K -12 institutions tend to ignore staff alumni.

My post-secondary alma mater basks regularly in the borrowed light of former students Hugh Hardy and Michael Graves. Bill Belichick used to come annually to Annapolis High School to visit with the Deputy Superintendent (his former coach) and the student athletes on the football team. Although it probably doesn’t raise test scores by a single point, opportunities to connect caring and successful adults with students open windows into worlds that are both exciting and aspirational. This opportunity exists for each and every educational institution. There are success stories out there that need to be told and successful student and staff alumni to be used as resources. If our stated goal in education is to give each and every student the tools to be successful, then inspiration provided by successful former students and staff cannot be ignored.

My former employer has at least seven current K – 12 school superintendents among their staff alumni and countless senior staff in other districts. Aren’t they a resource worth consulting on a regular and somewhat formal basis? Although some are consulted on an ad hoc basis from time to time, at the moment they appear to be an under-utilized and therefore missed opportunity.

Innovation as an Economic Engine

from Fast Company…

4 Things Obama Could Do To Foster America’s Creativity

INNOVATION ENGINE

WRITTEN BY: 

BOOSTING THE MIDDLE CLASS, RESEARCHING CLEAN ENERGY, BUILDING BETTER SCHOOLS–ALL GOOD STUFF. BUT IF YOU WANT REAL ECONOMIC VALUE, BRUCE NUSSBAUM ARGUES, PROMOTE CREATIVITY ACROSS THE NATION.

When President Barack Obama takes the stage on Tuesday night to deliver his State of the Union address, he’ll attempt to take the pulse of the nation and prescribe a cure. His message is going to focus on the economy and helping the middle class. But his prescriptions, as leaked to the media, appear to be standard political fare–boost R&D, build infrastructure, more clean energy, and better schools.

That’s all good, standard stuff but familiar stuff. The problem is that Obama isn’t a very creative president. He’s progressive (which is great by me) but not creative in the sense of sharply reframing our national narrative and offering dramatically different solutions to our challenges.

Here’s a different speech. President Obama reframes himself and America’s economic agenda by making creativity the centerpiece of his State of the Union. Obama makes raising America’s creative capacities his second-term goal. There is good reason to do this.

Creativity is the source of economic value. Creativity takes what money can’t buy and transforms it into what money can buy. We have spent decades focusing on efficiency, and it has brought us stagnating incomes and falling mobility for the middle class. It’s time to focus on creativity.

Why? First, because we have so little of it. Most of us believe we live in an age of innovation, because of our iPads, Google, Facebook. But the reality is shockingly different. In my new book, Creative Intelligence, I cite the business R&D and innovation surveys put out by the NSF and Census Bureau showing that only 9% of all public and private corporations do any product or service innovation. Think about that. I don’t have any stats for innovation in government services, but we can all imagine how bad that must be (with the exception of the military).

How could the president amplify the nation’s creativity? Here are four major reframes of our national economic narrative, Mr. President.

1. MAKE ENTREPRENEURSHIP, NOT BIG BUSINESS, THE CENTERPIECE OF ECONOMIC POLICY

Most of our innovation and jobs come from new companies that expand and grow. Tax, regulatory, R&D, banking, and trade policies should all be reframed to enable and scale startup companies. And bring entrepreneurs and venture capitalists to Washington to run cabinet posts, regulatory bodies, and perhaps most important of all, the Fed and other financial policymaking organizations.

2. MAKE MANUFACTURING, NOT BIOSCIENCE, THE MAJOR RECIPIENT OF FEDERAL R&D SPENDING

Washington has poured hundreds of billions of dollars into bioscience with little economic impact. Thanks to digital fabrication, open sourcing, and low-cost sales channels, a new “maker culture” is rising. The government should support it.

3. PROMOTE CROWDSOURCING. RELEASE THE JOBS ACT FROM THE SEC

Kickstarter is the most important organizational change to capitalism since outsourcing (crowdsourcing, in many ways, is the opposite of outsourcing). We can all be consumers, investors, designers, and producers in a creative process that makes things. Kickstarter alone raised $300 million in 2012 from direct contributions.

The JOBS Act expands crowdsourcing to a wider economic space, but the SEC is strangling it in an effort to protect investors. Cut the red tape.

4. MAKE ART AND SHOP COURSES CENTRAL TO EDUCATION

John Dewey and Maria Montessori both believed that the best way of learning is by doing. We need to develop a creative-arts curriculum that puts making at the center of our education. Bringing back art and shop to the classroom are simple steps to get us using our hands again. The rote memorization of math and science to pass tests will not make America a creative, prosperous nation.

We have come to define capitalism as strictly a market phenomenon based on efficiency and trading. This narrative has both alienated and impoverished us. We need to recast capitalism as a social movement led by entrepreneurs generating new products with high economic value.

Mr. President, reframing the country’s economic narrative can set the nation on a new journey toward prosperity. Amplifying America’s creativity is a story that engages all of us across the political spectrum.

Educational mash-up

  • Gladwell’s 10.000 hours of directed practice.
  • A recent New York Times Q & A with Google’s Karen May, VP of people development, talking about training. “If people opt in, versus being required to go, you’re more likely to have a better outcome.”
  • Glenn Singleton’s statistics about “the gap.”
  • Stephen Covey’s reminder that we can’t drastically change outcomes without changing the paradigm.

Is there a solution here somewhere? Can we stand the heat if we change our paradigm? Can we stand the results, if we don’t?

From Tim Brown’s blog …

A Design Lens on Education

November 13, 2012

 

“Education provides the foundation of our global possibilities. We design this well, and the whole world changes.”

I agree wholeheartedly with this statement from Sandy Speicher, one of the few people I know who is well qualified to have a perspective on both design and education. Her journey has taken her from graphic designer to college professor to education designer to education expert. Sandy now leads the education practice at IDEO.

Recently I asked Sandy to share her thoughts on design thinking in education. Here’s an excerpt:

What’s different when you look at the world of education through the lens of design?

Most of us have deeply embedded ideas about what’s “right” for education. But when you look at the world of education through the lens of design, you start to see that there isn’t one right answer, there are many. And when you really examine the world of education, you realize that “the system” is actually an outcome of millions of different solutions, organizations, priorities, and experiences. As designers, our job is to understand the conditions in any given situation deeply enough to be able to find new, relevant solutions for a particular context, need, or challenge—whether it’s about interactions in the classroom or the structures that drive our system.

What are some of the big questions in education that design is helping to address?

Some of my favorites we’ve been working on at IDEO include:
How might we create a digital learning platform that helps adult learners succeed through college completion?
How might we develop a network of schools that are of international quality, affordable (under $100/month tuition), and can be scaled to serve hundreds of thousands of children in the rising middle class of Peru?
How might we engage parents in understanding national trends and topics in education?
How might we design a comprehensive learning environment that seamlessly connects the classroom with the opportunities of the digital world for middle-school students?
How might we create system-level solutions that help more students gain access to college?

I’d love to see design address challenges of the financial models that underlie education institutions, ecosystem development for continuous innovation in education, and ways we can increase access to quality education around the globe.

What are some ways we are seeing the application of design thinking within education?

We’re seeing people use design thinking to create change at multiple levels—from national education reform to individual classroom needs. Teachers find it to be an engaging pedagogical approach, because in order to create new solutions, you cannot help but learn about people and their interests, about business or math or science or engineering. Plus, while students are learning the specific knowledge set required to develop a relevant and buildable solution, they’re also developing highly valuable skills such as empathy, the ability to collaborate, to deal with ambiguity, and of course, to create.

We’re also seeing teachers use design thinking to redesign the curriculum around experiences that engage students, and shift their physical classrooms based on feedback from students. We’re seeing school leaders engage faculty to develop a shared philosophy on teaching and learning; district administration using design to reimagine tools they create to help teachers be successful. We’re even seeing community volunteer groups engage in a process to help redesign schools that are less successful within their state system. Each of these stories alone is not the answer to whole-scale education reform—but if you multiply these activities by three million teachers across this country, and magnify that by the organizations that are creating new, human-centered tools and services to support our students—it can add up to a big impact on the system.

What was the path you took to becoming a designer of educational systems and tools?

My background is in visual communications. I began my career by creating brand identity systems, signage systems, and interactive systems for organizations. While I was working, I volunteered to teach design to 5th graders in San Francisco for about 6 years. (I probably learned the most about my own work and beliefs about how design can impact the world by having to essentialize it and create projects that would be clear and engaging for 10-year-olds!)

I then spent a couple of years teaching design at Washington University in St. Louis. In one deeply meaningful discussion with a group of students, I had the realization that our system needs the type of thinking that we designers bring to the table—being aware of the world around you, the knowledge that you have a role in shaping that world, and a belief that a new future is possible. We desperately need this next generation to address the giant challenges our world faces. Our current system, it seemed, wasn’t really preparing them for this future. I decided to go back to school to study education, to learn about the ways we can design for learning, and to help me reimagine what my role in the world could be.

Now, educators from all over the world email me asking how they can apply design to their work, and designers email me asking for advice on how they can help education. This shift is very exciting to me, because there is perhaps nothing more important for us to design well in this world than our systems of education. Education provides the foundation of our global possibilities. We design this well, and the whole world changes.